The Ethical Argument for Free Trade – Daniel Hannan on Brexit

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Daniel Hannan is one of Brexit’s biggest champions. A Member of the European Parliament and a leading Euroskeptic, Hannan’s advocacy of withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union has earned him international attention. While critics regarded the “Vote Leave” campaign as a dangerous retreat from globalization, Hannan has made consistent, libertarian arguments for withdrawal as a path towards greater democracy and free markets.

Noting the E.U.’s sluggish economic growth rates and its failure to establish free trade agreements with China and India, Hannan believes the U.K. should take charge of its own economic destiny. “I want people to be making the ethical argument for free trade as the supreme instrument of poverty alleviation, of conflict resolution and of social justice,” Hannan says. He adds, “It’s the multinationals that thrive on the distortions and the tariffs and the quotas, he says. “And it’s the poor who will benefit most from their removal.”

Hannan pushes back against the charge of Brexit as a symptom of xenophobia. Following the Brexit win, he says, poll numbers demonstrate that voters were most concerned with sovereignty. “All of the polls were very clear that the biggest issue was democracy. Immigration was a very distant second,” he says. “People wanted a sense of control and I think that’s a perfectly legitimate thing.”

With Brexit not taking effect until 2019 and the terms of withdrawal not yet negotiated, the United Kingdom’s future has rarely seemed so uncertain. In two year’s time, the U.K. will have the opportunity to decide on its own policies of trade and immigration. Hannan is confident his country will do the right thing.

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Interview by Nick Gillespie. Edited by Alex Manning. Camera by Meredith Bragg and Jim Epstein.