Ex-Cybersecurity Director Convicted Of Kiddy Porn

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There seems to be someone asleep at the wheel in the federal government’s HR department, given how many questionable people have been put in high profile/high responsibility security positions.

By Timoth Geigner @ Tech Dirt

Kieth Alexander, uber-Patriot, locked his cyber-security expertise up with a patent. The White House’s cyber-security guy can’t wait to tell you how little he knows about his job. Homeland Security’s former Inspector General was accused of a ridiculously long list of questionable behavior (in addition to having no qualifications for the job). And now, ex-director of cybersecurity for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has been convicted on kiddy porn charges.

Timothy DeFoggi, 56, formerly of Germantown, Md., is the sixth individual to be convicted as part of an ongoing investigation targeting three child pornography websites, the Justice Department said. He faces sentencing on Nov. 7 based on the findings Tuesday that he engaged in a child-exploitation enterprise, conspired to advertise and distribute child pornography, and accessed a computer with intent to view child pornography in connection with his membership in a child-pornography website.

Oh, well that’s just great. The head cyber-security guy for a government organization that includes divisions for preventing child abuse and child support enforcement was a pedophile at best. Let’s be clear: according to the evidence presented by prosecutors, DeFoggi is simply as bad as it gets.

“Through the website, DeFoggi accessed child pornography, solicited child pornography from other members, and exchanged private messages with other members where he expressed an interest in the violent rape and murder of children,” prosecutors added. “DeFoggi even suggested meeting one member in person to fulfill their mutual fantasies to violently rape and murder children.”

I’d like to take a moment to remind everyone reading this that the United States federal government has engaged in widespread surveillance on its own people. They’re watching what you do, particularly online. They’re intruding on our lives in ways Orwell couldn’t have dreamed of. And they’re doing it all under the notion that it’s for our protection. If we must live with that kind of intrusion for the time being, is it too much to ask that the government manage to weed out violent child-rapists from their own ranks as some kind of accommodation?

This article originally appeared at Tech Dirt